Expect Additional Traffic at the Seattle Center Today for Starbucks Shareholders Meeting

There will be lots of traffic around Seattle Center and McCaw Hall Wednesday morning when people start showing up for the Starbucks shareholders meeting.

The Seattle Department of Transportation said drivers should expect heavy traffic because of the meeting and on-going construction projects in the area.

Expect traffic volumes to be higher than usual heading into and around Lower Queen Anne.

The meeting starts at 10 a.m. Wednesday, but doors open at 8 a.m. About 2,700 people are expected to attend.

There will be extra traffic heading out of the neighborhood from noon to 2 p.m.

Meanwhile, Howard Schultz will attend his last shareholders meeting as the company’s CEO.

Schultz announced he was stepping down in December.

Starbucks chief operating officer Kevin Johnson will become the new CEO on April 3.

Schultz will move to the role of executive chairman.

Syndicated from KIRO 7 News. Featured photo source: Wikipedia Commons.

Queen Anne’s Bite Box Hosts Wine Bar Pop-Up Every Tuesday

Grub used to host pop-up restaurants that brought different flavors to Queen Anne each month. Now, Grub owner Sharon Fillingim has shifted gears with her new restaurant Bite Box, but that doesn’t mean pop-ups are over. Starting last week, on Tuesday, March 7th, a pop-up wine bar will be at Bite Box every Tuesday from 4:30pm to 9:30pm.

Zach Geballe, a Seattle sommelier and local wine writer, will run Disgorged out of Bite Box with a mission to “explore the world of wine with a little less pretension and a bit more expression”. What can you expect? Delicious wines from both the Pacific Northwest and the world, along with rotating mystery wines – guess what you taste and win prizes!

Zach will call upon his expertise as the Dahlia Lounge wine lead and wine writer for Seattle Weekly, SIP Northwest, and The Fresh Toast, to find fun and interesting wines for patrons to try. Plus, the prices are really reasonable at $10 or less a glass. And, small bites (cheeses, meats, olives) will be available too.

Stop by Bite Box at 307 W McGraw St on Tuesdays from 4:30pm to 9:30pm to experience Disgorged!

Syndicated from QueenAnneView.com

Visit These Queen Anne Restaurants for Dine Around Seattle

Dine Around Seattle returned for 2017 on Sunday, March 5th, and a couple of Queen Anne restaurants are participating! Dine Around Seattle is a little bit more fun than Seattle Restaurant Week, in that the restaurant isn’t limited to the three-course prix-fixe format of appetizer, entree, and dessert. Instead, Dine Around Seattle allows a little bit more flexibility, so that the restaurants can show off the things that they specialize in. After all, Dine Around Seattle is intended to support local businesses and what better way to do that than by letting the restaurants show off their best?

According to the program’s website, “For fifteen years, Dine Around Seattle has connected tens of thousands of residents with the best of Seattle’s restaurants, contributing millions to our local economy and strengthening our community.”

Lunch at participating restaurants is $18/person, while dinner price packages range from $22 or $33, to $44 depending on the restaurant and their offering. Sister eateries Toulouse Petit and Peso’s Kitchen & Lounge are participating for lunch and dinner, while the elegant LloydMartin is just participating for the evening (the restaurant isn’t open for lunch).

Dine Around Seattle continues Sunday to Thursday each week through March 23rd, so visit these Queen Anne restaurants and enjoy a discounted meal, while supporting local businesses. Enjoy!

Featured photo source: Dine Around Seattle Facebook Page

Film Comes To Life In “Film Is Dead” Exhibit

In the midst of the digital age, many are astounded that film still even exists. Everyone has digital film and video capabilities, and film Is very expensive, so, why bother right?

While that may have been what you thought once upon a time, your mind will be forever changed once you see the brilliant art made on and with film by artist Jennifer West at her Seattle Art Museum installation “Film Is Dead”.

In this revolutionarily inventive show, West uses 70mm, 35mm and 16mm analog film strips to create beautiful and visually compelling works of art. She treats the film with common household items including food coloring, nail polish, coffee, vinegar, bleach and more to create patterns and unplanned but stunning effects by eroding the films emulsion, staining it and letting the film take one whatever characters it might.

West’s SAM exhibit features film strips and remnants that have been treated and manipulated by the artist in this way, hung from the ceiling, and spanning almost the entire length of the gallery.

In addition to the physical installation at SAM, West has taken many of these works and digitized them to create a film that explores the differences and relationship between the analog and digital qualities of the film medium, creating another layer to this thought provoking artistic experiment.

Jennifer West is a Los Angeles based artist with some history in the Seattle. West received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Evergreen State College in Olympia before returning to her home state of California to earn her Masters in Fine Arts from ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena.

West’s works have been displayed in various solo and group exhibitions across the country and the world including Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Lisa Cooley Gallery, New York, NY, Yuz Museum, Shanghai, China, Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, Transmission Gallery, Glasgow, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, OR and many more.

Her love affair with film dates back more than ten years and she boasts a very interesting and varied portfolio of works including photographic and video works using different and rare types of film and film techniques, light play, performance and her unique film quilts and magic lantern works. West’s style and aesthetic are likely different from any you’ve seen before, exploring and challenging the differences between modern digital photographic art and classic analog film techniques. Her style simultaneously evokes nostalgic feelings and encapsulates a modern and almost futuristic aesthetic, and over all seems to challenge films obsoleteness and the digital waves supremacy.

If you share a love of visual arts, interesting techniques, the fusion of arts and science or simply subscribe to the thought that everything old is new again, “Film Is Dead” is a show worth seeing, if for no other reason than to see something beautiful before it’s gone.

JENNIFER WEST: FILM IS DEAD . . .

Exhibit on display through SUN MAY 7 2017

SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

THIRD FLOOR GALLERIES