Monthly Archives: October 2017

Days Numbered for Musicians Mural in Lower Queen Anne

By Stephen Cohen

It’s a familiar site for those driving by the former home of Silver Platters on 705 5th Ave. North in lower Queen Anne, but it won’t be much longer.

The large mural painted on the back of the building — and the building itself, which was recently home to the Seattle Immersive Theatre — will be coming down over the next couple of months. In its place, a five-story, 99-unit apartment complex will rise, according to plans submitted to the city.

The mural was painted over three long weekends in 2012 by students attending a one-time summer camp by local artist Don Rockwell. According to Silver Platters owner Mike Batt, the mural had a dual purpose: In addition to paying tribute to artists like Buddy Holly and Jimi Hendrix, murals by local artists tended to keep graffiti artists away.

While he has fond memories of the project, Rockwell isn’t exactly mourning the upcoming loss.

“I wouldn’t bend over backwards trying to preserve it. It was a student effort, and they had fun doing it and they learned a lot,” Rockwell said.

Rockwell said the design, which features artists from Louis Armstrong to Bob Dylan, was meant to show the connection of different types of pop music, from gospel to blues to jazz to rock and roll.

Rockwell’s work can be seen throughout the city, including at the current Silver Platters location in Sodo, which features an indoor mural that pays “homage to the history of music in the Northwest,” according to Batt.

As a longtime sign painter and mural artist, Rockwell is used to the transitory nature of his work, which helps explain his laissez-faire attitude toward its future.

“I’m surprised it was up there as long as it was,” he said.

In addition to painting new murals on the outside of Silver Platters in Sodo, Rockwell is currently working on a project at the Lagunitas brewery in Ballard.

Story syndicated from SeattlePI.com, featured photo credit Grant Hindsley.

For the Health of it! The Seattle/King County Clinic is on now.  

 

In this day and age, medical care can be tricky.

Whether you have insurance or you don’t, there are many factors that can make getting the regular exams and care you need a challenge or at least, really expensive.

Luckily, thanks to the Seattle/King County Clinic, you can receive the care you need FOR FREE.

That’s right, you have from now until this Sunday, October 29th to go to Key Arena and seek out the medical care or examinations you may need, at no cost to you.

The services provided at this clinic include medical care, vision care and dental care, all provided by a caring staff of professionals volunteering their time and skills to help people within the community.

From the website-

Seattle/King County Clinic brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in KeyArena at Seattle Center.  The four-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region. The next Clinic is scheduled for October 26 – 29, 2017.

If you or someone you know is in need of a routine checkup or has more serious concerns for their vision, dental or general medical health, now is your chance to receive excellent care from highly trained and generous professionals, for free.

This amazing event is brought to the community by the Seattle Center Foundation and supported by donations from community members like you.

To learn more about getting involved or donating to help to keep this event going, please visit their website or click here.

 

Keeping our community healthy is of the utmost importance and events like this make that possible. Thank you to all of the volunteers, professional and community donations that make this event possible, and our community a better place to live!

Volunteer to Keep Trick-Or-Treaters Safe This Halloween

Halloween is just over a week away, and the Queen Anne Chamber of Commerce is looking for volunteers to help as crossing guards for the holiday to keep little costumed kiddos safe.

The annual Trick-Or-Treat along upper Queen Anne Avenue N will take place next Tuesday, October 31st from 3 – 6 p.m. Trick-Or-Treaters will be going door-to-door between McGraw and Galer to collect candy and other treats from the shops, restaurants and other participating establishments.

To volunteer to be a crossing guard, visit the Queen Anne Chamber of Commerce’s website to register. You’ll need to meet 15 minutes before the fun starts, at 2:45 p.m. at Umpqua Bank at 1630 Queen Anne Ave N. You’ll pick up your safety flags and vests, and two guards will be posted for each cross street within the trick-or-treating area.

Drivers, please try to avoid Queen Anne Avenue N on Tuesday afternoon to help keep kids even safer.

City Approves Lower Queen Anne Rezone to 65-Foot Buildings

The City Council unanimously agreed to pass the measure to rezone buildings between Roy Street and Denny Way to a cap of 85 feet on Monday, October 2nd. The existing buildings in that area are less than half that height.

Seattle Mayor Tim Burgess signed a slightly altered version of the rezone into law last week, on Wednesday, October 11th. The alteration reduced the cap to 65 feet.

The need for more housing and specifically, affordable housing has the City Council and many neighborhood residents cheering on the decision. According to a KUOW report, the rezone in the Lower Queen Anne area (also known as Uptown) is expected to result in a minimum of 600 new affordable homes by the year 2038 (20 years).

However, these affordable homes won’t necessarily be located in the Uptown neighborhood, since developers will have the option to either dedicate a portion (7-10 percent of residential buildings and 5-10 percent of commercial developments) to be priced for households with lower income, or they can instead pay into the city’s affordable housing fund.

“The actual affordable housing is not going to be built on site. The majority of it is going to be paid in lieu so a lot of people think they are going to get affordable housing but it’s not going to be in the areas these zoning changes are occurring,” said Jon Lisbin, president of Seattle Fair Growth.

Despite the Council’s unanimous vote, many neighbors are concerned. The CEO of the Bayview Nursing Home, Mary Cordts, expressed concerns that buildings of the new height could block daylight for members of her retirement community. Cordts did say that a reduction from the initially proposed 85-foot cap to 65 feet would be more manageable, so it appears her suggestion was applied when the legislation passed last week.

Another community member, Alexandra Moore-Wulsin, told KUOW News that her concerns were more about the more widespread effects on the community: “In fact, what it is doing is gentrifying this neighborhood, and it’s being replaced by shadowy, corrugated steel and brick canyons. Please don’t do this to our city,” she said.