Monthly Archives: December 2017

Queen Anne Events: Things to Do in January

Things are slowing down in the New Year, but there are still some interesting Queen Anne events to attend and/or participate in coming up in January…

January 7: Scandinavian Pancake Breakfast
8am – 1pm | Swedish Club NW
The Swedish Club NW’s monthly pancake breakfast features an authentic Swedish pancake breakfast complete with ham, lingonberries and all of the fixings. This month, it will take place on January 7th, with live music TBD. The price is $9 for adults, $7 for club members and $5 for children ages 5-12.

January 13 – 27: Così fan Tutte
10am – 6pm | McCaw Hall
The Seattle Opera presents Così fan Tutte, a comedic and beautiful performance that features some of the most ravishing music of Mozart. The story is about two men who decide to test their fiancees’ faithfulness by donning disguises and attempting to tempt them. Performances are scattered throughout January, between the 13th and 27th.

January 15: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
9am – 4pm | Seattle Children’s Museum
The Seattle Children’s Museum is celebrating the work of Martin Luther King, Jr. on Monday, January 15th with a day full of special programs that emphasize collaboration, social justice and equity.

January 26: All Beet Dinner Pop-Up
6:30pm – 10pm | The Bite Box
Chef Aaron Tekulve from The Bite Box is presenting a special pop-up dinner to feature some delicious dishes with beets as the star ingredient. Tickets are $95 per person—reserve your space ahead of time to ensure your seat!

100-Unit Interbay Apartment Development Clears Review Board

By Joe Veyera

A proposal to build an eight-story apartment complex with nearly 100 units just north of the Interbay Golf Center was well received in its return to the West Design Review Board on Wednesday night.

The plan for 3008 16th Ave. W. had gotten favorable feedback during an early design guidance meeting in February, but faced three new board members as architects sought final approval.

Urbal Architecture principal Chad Lorentz said the project was driven by three points, unchanged from the last meeting; enhancing the dead end that separates the alley on the back end of the property from 15th Avenue West to make it safer and improve the pedestrian experience, taking advantage of the site’s “peninsula,” which allows for unobstructed views on three sides, and creating a “jewel box,” through the development’s massing and building materials to float above the solid, recessed base.

The plan calls for the lobby and four loft units at ground level along 16th Avenue West, with a fitness center on the second floor, and studio, one, and two-bedroom units on floors three through eight. That top level also includes a common lounge and patio space, with a deck and patio on the roof as well. Parking for up to 45 vehicles is included in a garage on the first two levels; 30 on the first with the use of a stacking system, and another 15 on the next floor, with separate entries for both.

The presence of the Interbay Athletic Complex directly to the west of the site — and how the field lights would affect the units at night — was also a factor in the design. It was something planners noticed after one visit, arriving after dark only to see those lights switched on minutes later.

“You watched everyone [at a nearby apartment complex] pull their shades down, and it became a blank façade, so we really took that to heart,” Lorentz said.

In turn, the layout of the units and the placement of their windows are meant to shade the apartments from that direct glare. Those windows are also mirrored from one another, and combine with minor recesses and the choice of building materials to activate the façade.

Those elements all earned positive feedback from the board, while much of the deliberation Wednesday regarded a detail that had also drawn attention during early design guidance. Concerned remained from members about the building’s north side, a blank wall for those approaching the site along 16th Avenue West.

Lorentz explained the choice, saying both the apartment signage and a vertical art piece that would tie into that branding will serve as an effective way finding feature.

“We actually think that the blank façade is a real important feature of this building,” he said.

The board, however, wanted more specifics for what that would look like.

“Right now, they’re kind of asking for an open license to do whatever, once they resolve their brand, and this is a major component of this project,” said board member Stephen Porter.

Though a living wall was found to be ultimately unviable by the planners, the board asked that the art element be based on the wilderness concept that informed the site’s landscape approach. The planting design emphasizes Northwest native species — many of which attract birds, butterflies, and bees — in response to feedback provided in February.

The board also okayed a trio of zoning departures, including one that allows for the two parking garage access points — one off of the alley, one off West Barrett Street — and another regarding the eighth floor lounge and patio. With the size of the patio smaller than the minimum to be considered an “amenity area,” the board was in favor of plans for an articulated, transparent wall that would connect the space to the lounge, allowing for the flexibility of both indoor and outdoor uses.

After Wednesday’s meeting, the plan now awaits final corrections by project architects, after which the Seattle Department of Construction & Inspections will publish its final decision and issue a master use permit.

Syndicated from The Queen Anne News.

KeyArena Redevelopment Progresses with MOU

By Joe Veyera

A more than $600 million plan to redevelop KeyArena with the hopes of luring professional hockey and men’s basketball to Seattle moved one step closer to reality on Monday, after the Seattle City Council voted 7-1 to approve a memorandum of understanding with the Oak View Group.

Councilmember Mike O’Brien was the lone dissenting vote, while Lorena Gonzalez was not in attendance.

Under the agreement, OVG is responsible for the entirety of project costs, in addition to overruns, along with $40 million in neighborhood transportation improvements over the term of a 39-year lease, as informed by a mobility action plan also paid for by the group.

Construction is expected to begin by the end of next year, with an opening of the renovated venue in October 2020.

KeyArena in its current state. Photo by Joe Veyera

KeyArena in its current state. Photo by Joe Veyera

“This redevelopment unlocks the potential for the best new arena for sports, entertainment, high-tech expos, concerts and more — with partners who have already demonstrated their commitment to partnering with the City for success,” she said.

In a separate statement, Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda said she was, “proud to support a project aligned with the progressive values and shared prosperity for which Seattle is now legendary,” as she cast her first vote.

“We are experiencing a unique moment in our City’s history and with it comes an opportunity to preserve one of our cities most iconic public assets for the benefit of the public good,” she said. “This project recreates a world-class, multi-purpose sports and entertainment facility (including women’s sports!) which will become a cherished part of Seattle’s legacy.

Monday’s vote, while a key milestone in the process, won’t be the last one by the council. The MOU provides a framework for a development agreement, lease agreement, and Seattle Center Integration Agreement, all of which still require council approval in the coming months.

Syndicated from the QueenAnneNews.com

Queen Anne Real Estate Report – November 2017

The Seattle real estate market is still one of the most talked about in the nation. Though that hasn’t changed, many home prices have. There were 63 sales in the Queen Anne neighborhood last month, 31 single-family homes and 32 condos.

Sold this year by Ewing and Clark

As Seattle grows, so does the value of the homes. The median sales price for a single-family home jumped from $935,000 (Nov. 2016) to $1,042,000 (Nov. 2017). The average selling price was $1,346,971 and the average listing price was $1,390,692. The highest sold listing was $6,200,000, compared to $2,850,000 in November 2016.

Condominium sales in Queen Anne continue to rise in price. The median sales price increased from $352,500 (Nov. 2016) to $467,500 (Nov. 2017). The average selling price was $524,075. The highest sold condo was recorded at $1,175,000 and the lowest was $179,000.

There are currently 42 active listings and 60 pending.