Author Archives: Queen Anne Scene

Comedian John Cleese at McCaw Hall on March 26th – One Day ONLY!

Come spend a hilarious evening with the “One and Only” John Cleese. John is a legendary comedic actor best known for: “Monty Python’s Flying Circus”, “Fawlty Towers” and “A Fish Called Wanda”. This event is at McCaw Hall on Monday, March 26th at 7:30 p.m. Ticket prices start at $48.


“The world’s funniest man” first made his mark as a member of the legendary Monty Python troupe in the 1960s and has gone on to write, produce,  direct and star in some of the greatest comedic hits of the last forty years, even receiving an Oscar nomination for best screenplay for “A Fish Called Wanda”. But John is far from your garden variety entertainer. From the beginning of his career he has continually parlayed his enormous talents into advancing the political causes he believes in.

In 2014, John released his New York Times best-selling memoir, “So Anyway”… The book shares his ascent in the entertainment world, from his humble beginnings in a sleepy English town and his early comedic days at Cambridge University.

Don’t miss a hilarious minute as John Cleese shares his humorous insights on the world and politics and his life.

In addition to JOHN CLEESE, the below speakers are a part of this exciting series:

  • LAURA LING – Journalist freed from North Korean Prison, visits on Monday, May 7, 2018
  • SCOTT KELLY – Former Commander of the International Space Station, visits on Wednesday, May 23, 2018
  • VIOLA DAVIS – 2017 Best Support Actress Oscar winner for “Fences”, visits on Monday, June 18, 2018

Cute Queen Anne Cottage Listed for $1.1 Million

By Kelly Knickerbocker

Sitting hillside on the western slope of Queen Anne, this single-family home—built in 1928 and just a few blocks from Interbay’s busy 15th Avenue—is on the market for $1.1 million. Vintage with a modern pulse, this property offers just over 2,000 square feet of living space, plus updates galore without minimizing the home’s history.

From the curb, this home’s bright blue trim along the roofline, doorway, and windows livens up an otherwise tempered white exterior. A gabled roof reaches several peaks, but the highest emanates just above the front door, creating a focal point at the home’s perfect-for-potted-plants-sized front porch. Heading to or from the house, you’ll walk along a red brick sidewalk boasting a herringbone pattern.

Inside, a bright and airy space welcomes. Large windows line the living room walls, and light-colored hardwoods—which are in excellent shape and continue throughout the home’s main floor—keep the space anchored in light. Like the colorful Laurelhurst Tudor recently featured, this house includes a sought-after Batchelder tile fireplace for gathering ‘round.

The kitchen is cozy, but fully updated with gorgeous marble countertops and a Viking range. There’s a formal dining room, but the informal dining room is more interesting. It sits beside the kitchen and offers enough space for a four-person table. A floor-to-ceiling built-in sits against the walls, and includes ample storage and display space. French doors lead from the informal dining room onto a sunny, west-facing deck above the garage and overlooking the backyard.

The master bedroom of this monochrome home includes an en-suite bathroom—with double sinks and shower covered in subway tile—and a walk-in closet.

Of note: The master bedroom is the only bedroom on the main floor. The kids will have to hang out downstairs.

In the home’s large lower level, there are two additional bedrooms, a full bathroom, a media room, laundry facilities and interior access to the garage.

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Watch Seattle’s Growth Over the Past 3 Years

By Laura Fonda

The Space Needle PanoCam went live in January 2015 to snap images of Seattle from the spire of the Needle every 10 minutes. Now, a new time-lapse video uses the PanoCam images to illustrate Seattle’s growth in the past 3 years – and it’s pretty impressive. According to GeekWire, Ricardo Martin Brualla, a Google engineer, made the video with thousands of photographs from the PanoCam,

South Lake Union undergoes the most transformation, but time-lapses of downtown and Uptown have considerable upward movement as well. Essentially, it’s a 360 degree view of how the city has grown in the past couple of years, and it’s grown a lot:

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Design Review Approves Plan for 2 Apartment Buildings on Old Teatro ZinZanni Site

By Joe Veyera

The next act for the former site of Teatro ZinZanni is one step closer to reality, after development plans received approval from the West Design Review Board in a recommendation meeting on Wednesday night.

The project at 225 Roy St. includes one eight-story and one seven-story building with 269 apartments, just over 9,000 square feet of retail space at street-level, and underground parking for approximately 180 vehicles. Earlier plans had called for two eight-story structures, but neighbors along Roy Street had expressed concern about what that building height would mean for natural light in their apartments.

Developer Maria Barrientos said public feedback had, “a really strong influence,” on the design, with more than 20 meetings and presentations to various community groups over the last year and a half.

To that end, public comment Wednesday was almost unanimously in favor of the plan, with Uptown Alliance co-president Rick Hooper calling the process a “great model” for how a community can engage with developers.

“This site could have been a mundane project in the hands of somebody else,” said one attendee.

The proposal is also one of the first to account for building height increases allowed under a neighborhood rezone passed by the city council in October. The site is included in a small area north of Seattle Center that saw maximum heights more than double from 40 to 85 feet.

Board member Homero Nishiwaki acknowledged that as one of the challenges the project faced.

“It’s a very big project,” he said. “It’s not just big, it’s also very prominent, and it deals with a transitional period where a new code, a new height is being implemented.”

Nishiwaki — the lone holdover on the board from the project’s early design guidance meeting in April — said he felt many of the recommendations made at that time were incorporated into the updated design.

Among the elements to earn the board’s praise was the public plaza planned directly off Mercer Street (though its included in a separate permit) — something landscape architect Kris Snider of Hewitt said “put a stamp on this project,” as a commitment to the community — along with the high quality of materials proposed throughout the site as well.

Ultimately, the board gave its okay for the plans with a trio of conditions, one regarding the “gasket” that separates the massing volumes for the building along Third Avenue, and a second for material consistency throughout the project.

The third condition was the removal of a glass and steel weather protection canopy between the two buildings, which the board felt made the interior courtyard seem more like a private space than a public area.

“This is a public thoroughfare,” said board member Stephen Porter of the walkway down the middle of the site, connecting Mercer and Roy.

The board also approved a pair of zoning departures, one to allow for a continuous vertical façade along Roy Street — instead of an upper-level set-back — and a second allowing for a steeper driveway slope for the underground parking entrance.

The latter request drew questions from the board about its necessity, and what the alternative would be if the departure were denied.

Barrientos explained the entrance accounts for traffic entering and exiting the Mercer Street Garage, and that planned retail space at the corner of Third Avenue North and Mercer would be affected.

“We can’t keep the retail on Mercer at the grade it’s at without doing this,” she said.

That rationale was enough to earn the board’s approval by a 3-1 vote.

The plan now awaits the final published decision from the Seattle Department of Construction & Inspections, after which a master use permit will be issued.

For more information on the development, and a full list of project documents, visit and enter project number 3025946. 

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