Category Archives: Magnolia

100-Unit Interbay Apartment Development Clears Review Board

By Joe Veyera

A proposal to build an eight-story apartment complex with nearly 100 units just north of the Interbay Golf Center was well received in its return to the West Design Review Board on Wednesday night.

The plan for 3008 16th Ave. W. had gotten favorable feedback during an early design guidance meeting in February, but faced three new board members as architects sought final approval.

Urbal Architecture principal Chad Lorentz said the project was driven by three points, unchanged from the last meeting; enhancing the dead end that separates the alley on the back end of the property from 15th Avenue West to make it safer and improve the pedestrian experience, taking advantage of the site’s “peninsula,” which allows for unobstructed views on three sides, and creating a “jewel box,” through the development’s massing and building materials to float above the solid, recessed base.

The plan calls for the lobby and four loft units at ground level along 16th Avenue West, with a fitness center on the second floor, and studio, one, and two-bedroom units on floors three through eight. That top level also includes a common lounge and patio space, with a deck and patio on the roof as well. Parking for up to 45 vehicles is included in a garage on the first two levels; 30 on the first with the use of a stacking system, and another 15 on the next floor, with separate entries for both.

The presence of the Interbay Athletic Complex directly to the west of the site — and how the field lights would affect the units at night — was also a factor in the design. It was something planners noticed after one visit, arriving after dark only to see those lights switched on minutes later.

“You watched everyone [at a nearby apartment complex] pull their shades down, and it became a blank façade, so we really took that to heart,” Lorentz said.

In turn, the layout of the units and the placement of their windows are meant to shade the apartments from that direct glare. Those windows are also mirrored from one another, and combine with minor recesses and the choice of building materials to activate the façade.

Those elements all earned positive feedback from the board, while much of the deliberation Wednesday regarded a detail that had also drawn attention during early design guidance. Concerned remained from members about the building’s north side, a blank wall for those approaching the site along 16th Avenue West.

Lorentz explained the choice, saying both the apartment signage and a vertical art piece that would tie into that branding will serve as an effective way finding feature.

“We actually think that the blank façade is a real important feature of this building,” he said.

The board, however, wanted more specifics for what that would look like.

“Right now, they’re kind of asking for an open license to do whatever, once they resolve their brand, and this is a major component of this project,” said board member Stephen Porter.

Though a living wall was found to be ultimately unviable by the planners, the board asked that the art element be based on the wilderness concept that informed the site’s landscape approach. The planting design emphasizes Northwest native species — many of which attract birds, butterflies, and bees — in response to feedback provided in February.

The board also okayed a trio of zoning departures, including one that allows for the two parking garage access points — one off of the alley, one off West Barrett Street — and another regarding the eighth floor lounge and patio. With the size of the patio smaller than the minimum to be considered an “amenity area,” the board was in favor of plans for an articulated, transparent wall that would connect the space to the lounge, allowing for the flexibility of both indoor and outdoor uses.

After Wednesday’s meeting, the plan now awaits final corrections by project architects, after which the Seattle Department of Construction & Inspections will publish its final decision and issue a master use permit.

Syndicated from The Queen Anne News.

For the Health of it! The Seattle/King County Clinic is on now.  

 

In this day and age, medical care can be tricky.

Whether you have insurance or you don’t, there are many factors that can make getting the regular exams and care you need a challenge or at least, really expensive.

Luckily, thanks to the Seattle/King County Clinic, you can receive the care you need FOR FREE.

That’s right, you have from now until this Sunday, October 29th to go to Key Arena and seek out the medical care or examinations you may need, at no cost to you.

The services provided at this clinic include medical care, vision care and dental care, all provided by a caring staff of professionals volunteering their time and skills to help people within the community.

From the website-

Seattle/King County Clinic brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in KeyArena at Seattle Center.  The four-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region. The next Clinic is scheduled for October 26 – 29, 2017.

If you or someone you know is in need of a routine checkup or has more serious concerns for their vision, dental or general medical health, now is your chance to receive excellent care from highly trained and generous professionals, for free.

This amazing event is brought to the community by the Seattle Center Foundation and supported by donations from community members like you.

To learn more about getting involved or donating to help to keep this event going, please visit their website or click here.

 

Keeping our community healthy is of the utmost importance and events like this make that possible. Thank you to all of the volunteers, professional and community donations that make this event possible, and our community a better place to live!

The Market Opens June 1st!

The seasonal Queen Anne Farmers Market will be opening on June 1st!  Because of our unusually long rainy season this year in WA State (the longest on record in modern history), some of the farm vendors understandably had a delay with their crops. But our warm season is firmly underway now, as are abundant produce, herbs, and artisanal goods! And listen to the music provided while you shop.

Recently, Seattle was rated the 4th most fit city in the nation. One of the reasons cited for this improvement was the increase in the number of farmers markets in our area: a positive indication that unprocessed, natural food can make a difference in one’s health.

If you would like to visit other farmers markets in other neighborhoods as well, here is a list of places and hours from The Seattle Times. The Queen Anne Farmers Market will be on Thursdays, from 3-7:30 pm through October 12th. Bon appetit!

Film Comes To Life In “Film Is Dead” Exhibit

In the midst of the digital age, many are astounded that film still even exists. Everyone has digital film and video capabilities, and film Is very expensive, so, why bother right?

While that may have been what you thought once upon a time, your mind will be forever changed once you see the brilliant art made on and with film by artist Jennifer West at her Seattle Art Museum installation “Film Is Dead”.

In this revolutionarily inventive show, West uses 70mm, 35mm and 16mm analog film strips to create beautiful and visually compelling works of art. She treats the film with common household items including food coloring, nail polish, coffee, vinegar, bleach and more to create patterns and unplanned but stunning effects by eroding the films emulsion, staining it and letting the film take one whatever characters it might.

West’s SAM exhibit features film strips and remnants that have been treated and manipulated by the artist in this way, hung from the ceiling, and spanning almost the entire length of the gallery.

In addition to the physical installation at SAM, West has taken many of these works and digitized them to create a film that explores the differences and relationship between the analog and digital qualities of the film medium, creating another layer to this thought provoking artistic experiment.

Jennifer West is a Los Angeles based artist with some history in the Seattle. West received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Evergreen State College in Olympia before returning to her home state of California to earn her Masters in Fine Arts from ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena.

West’s works have been displayed in various solo and group exhibitions across the country and the world including Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Lisa Cooley Gallery, New York, NY, Yuz Museum, Shanghai, China, Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, Transmission Gallery, Glasgow, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, OR and many more.

Her love affair with film dates back more than ten years and she boasts a very interesting and varied portfolio of works including photographic and video works using different and rare types of film and film techniques, light play, performance and her unique film quilts and magic lantern works. West’s style and aesthetic are likely different from any you’ve seen before, exploring and challenging the differences between modern digital photographic art and classic analog film techniques. Her style simultaneously evokes nostalgic feelings and encapsulates a modern and almost futuristic aesthetic, and over all seems to challenge films obsoleteness and the digital waves supremacy.

If you share a love of visual arts, interesting techniques, the fusion of arts and science or simply subscribe to the thought that everything old is new again, “Film Is Dead” is a show worth seeing, if for no other reason than to see something beautiful before it’s gone.

JENNIFER WEST: FILM IS DEAD . . .

Exhibit on display through SUN MAY 7 2017

SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

THIRD FLOOR GALLERIES