Category Archives: News

Queen Anne Real Estate Report – November 2017

The Seattle real estate market is still one of the most talked about in the nation. Though that hasn’t changed, many home prices have. There were 63 sales in the Queen Anne neighborhood last month, 31 single-family homes and 32 condos.

Sold this year by Ewing and Clark

As Seattle grows, so does the value of the homes. The median sales price for a single-family home jumped from $935,000 (Nov. 2016) to $1,042,000 (Nov. 2017). The average selling price was $1,346,971 and the average listing price was $1,390,692. The highest sold listing was $6,200,000, compared to $2,850,000 in November 2016.

Condominium sales in Queen Anne continue to rise in price. The median sales price increased from $352,500 (Nov. 2016) to $467,500 (Nov. 2017). The average selling price was $524,075. The highest sold condo was recorded at $1,175,000 and the lowest was $179,000.

There are currently 42 active listings and 60 pending.

 

December 13th is a Design Review for an 8-Story Interbay Apartment Building

By Joe Veyera

A proposed eight-story development in Interbay with nearly 100 apartments will again go before the West Design Review Board later this month.

A recommendation phase meeting for the project is set for Dec. 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the Queen Anne Community Center (1901 1st Ave. W.), almost 10 months after architects received positive feedback on the plan during early design guidance.

The proposal for 3008 16th Ave. W. currently calls for 93 residential units and 45 parking spaces; down one apartment and eight spots from what was presented in February.

At that meeting, the board expressed its support for the project’s preferred “Jewel Box,” massing option, and how it affected the configuration of its units (providing both a north or south view in addition to one of 15th Avenue West), and a rooftop common room.

The board also encouraged the continued development of an, “articulated, modulated, and textured design expression,” to keep the design from becoming merely a flat cube, and wanted to see a potential blank façade on the building’s north side be further studied, both in terms how it would interact with future development and how to integrate art or another cultural reflection in the meantime.

Pastakia + Associates and Teutsch Partners are the developers for the site, with Urbal Architecture serving as project architects. That firm lists the, “contrasting composition [which] consists of a grounded base and light upper stories with shimmering, airy details,” and, “contemporary facades with a mix of highly transparent materials, vertical metal siding and unique geometric angles,” as among the project’s key features on its website.

Comments on site planning and design issues regarding the development may be submitted through Dec. 12 via email to PRC@seattle.gov, or to City of Seattle – Seattle DCI – PRC, 700 5th Avenue, Suite 2000, PO Box 34019, Seattle, WA 98124-4019.

For more information on the development, and a full list of documents, visit web6.seattle.gov/dpd/edms/ and enter project number 3026027.

Syndicated from QueenAnneNews.com

New 3-Story Building Planned for Parking Lot Next to the Frances Skinner Edris Nursing Home

By Brian Miller
The three-story building at 2120 First Ave. N. opened in 1923 as a nurses’ residence for Seattle Children’s Orthopedic Hospital.

Tucked between Queen Anne Manor and the Safeway on Upper Queen Anne is a charming little Georgian-style three-story building at 2120 First Ave. N.

It was developed in 1923 as a nurses’ residence for Seattle Children’s Orthopedic Hospital, which was located in what is now the Queen Anne Manor retirement community. The narrow property extends from North Boston to North Crockett streets, and shares the block with the former hospital, built in 1910.

Seattle Children’s moved to Laurelhurst in 1953, and the nurses’ residence was used for offices by King County.

In the late 1970s, the American Cancer Society bought the small building, also called the Frances Skinner Edris Nursing Home, for offices. Now ACS is selling the entire 16,005-square-foot property, which includes a parking lot to the south.

JLL’s Jordan Louie and Doug Hanafin are the brokers, and their listing says that ACS intends to lease back the offices through the first quarter of 2019, allowing time for entitlements.

“I have it under contract,” confirms Brian Regan of Equinox Properties. “We hope to close in December.”

Regan hired Skidmore Janette as the architect, and filed an early plan for a project that he calls Arbor Space.

On the parking lot to the south, a new three-story building would have “potentially 40 units” with one level of underground parking.

The existing ACS building, with about 13,000 square feet, would remain as office space serving smaller tenants. “I’d probably landmark it,” says Regan, given the historic provenance, before making interior upgrades and other renovations.

The building was designed by A.H. Albertson (1872-1964). Alone or with partners, Albertson also designed Northern Life Tower (aka Seattle Tower), the Cobb Building, the downtown YMCA, Cornish College’s Spanish-style Kerry Hall and the Women’s University Club.

“It’s a pretty amazing building,” says Regan. “It’s in pretty good shape.”

Separately, Regan says he hopes to have permits in February or March for 9th Space, an office building he is planning at 308 Ninth Ave. N., in South Lake Union. Skidmore Janette is also the architect for that project.

Meanwhile, next door to the ACS building, Safeway intends to redevelop its property with a new store and 251 units above. Holland Partner Group is developing that project for Safeway.

Syndicated from the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Days Numbered for Musicians Mural in Lower Queen Anne

By Stephen Cohen

It’s a familiar site for those driving by the former home of Silver Platters on 705 5th Ave. North in lower Queen Anne, but it won’t be much longer.

The large mural painted on the back of the building — and the building itself, which was recently home to the Seattle Immersive Theatre — will be coming down over the next couple of months. In its place, a five-story, 99-unit apartment complex will rise, according to plans submitted to the city.

The mural was painted over three long weekends in 2012 by students attending a one-time summer camp by local artist Don Rockwell. According to Silver Platters owner Mike Batt, the mural had a dual purpose: In addition to paying tribute to artists like Buddy Holly and Jimi Hendrix, murals by local artists tended to keep graffiti artists away.

While he has fond memories of the project, Rockwell isn’t exactly mourning the upcoming loss.

“I wouldn’t bend over backwards trying to preserve it. It was a student effort, and they had fun doing it and they learned a lot,” Rockwell said.

Rockwell said the design, which features artists from Louis Armstrong to Bob Dylan, was meant to show the connection of different types of pop music, from gospel to blues to jazz to rock and roll.

Rockwell’s work can be seen throughout the city, including at the current Silver Platters location in Sodo, which features an indoor mural that pays “homage to the history of music in the Northwest,” according to Batt.

As a longtime sign painter and mural artist, Rockwell is used to the transitory nature of his work, which helps explain his laissez-faire attitude toward its future.

“I’m surprised it was up there as long as it was,” he said.

In addition to painting new murals on the outside of Silver Platters in Sodo, Rockwell is currently working on a project at the Lagunitas brewery in Ballard.

Story syndicated from SeattlePI.com, featured photo credit Grant Hindsley.