Category Archives: News

Days Numbered for Musicians Mural in Lower Queen Anne

By Stephen Cohen

It’s a familiar site for those driving by the former home of Silver Platters on 705 5th Ave. North in lower Queen Anne, but it won’t be much longer.

The large mural painted on the back of the building — and the building itself, which was recently home to the Seattle Immersive Theatre — will be coming down over the next couple of months. In its place, a five-story, 99-unit apartment complex will rise, according to plans submitted to the city.

The mural was painted over three long weekends in 2012 by students attending a one-time summer camp by local artist Don Rockwell. According to Silver Platters owner Mike Batt, the mural had a dual purpose: In addition to paying tribute to artists like Buddy Holly and Jimi Hendrix, murals by local artists tended to keep graffiti artists away.

While he has fond memories of the project, Rockwell isn’t exactly mourning the upcoming loss.

“I wouldn’t bend over backwards trying to preserve it. It was a student effort, and they had fun doing it and they learned a lot,” Rockwell said.

Rockwell said the design, which features artists from Louis Armstrong to Bob Dylan, was meant to show the connection of different types of pop music, from gospel to blues to jazz to rock and roll.

Rockwell’s work can be seen throughout the city, including at the current Silver Platters location in Sodo, which features an indoor mural that pays “homage to the history of music in the Northwest,” according to Batt.

As a longtime sign painter and mural artist, Rockwell is used to the transitory nature of his work, which helps explain his laissez-faire attitude toward its future.

“I’m surprised it was up there as long as it was,” he said.

In addition to painting new murals on the outside of Silver Platters in Sodo, Rockwell is currently working on a project at the Lagunitas brewery in Ballard.

Story syndicated from SeattlePI.com, featured photo credit Grant Hindsley.

For the Health of it! The Seattle/King County Clinic is on now.  

 

In this day and age, medical care can be tricky.

Whether you have insurance or you don’t, there are many factors that can make getting the regular exams and care you need a challenge or at least, really expensive.

Luckily, thanks to the Seattle/King County Clinic, you can receive the care you need FOR FREE.

That’s right, you have from now until this Sunday, October 29th to go to Key Arena and seek out the medical care or examinations you may need, at no cost to you.

The services provided at this clinic include medical care, vision care and dental care, all provided by a caring staff of professionals volunteering their time and skills to help people within the community.

From the website-

Seattle/King County Clinic brings together healthcare organizations, civic agencies, non-profits, private businesses and volunteers from across the State of Washington to produce a giant free health clinic in KeyArena at Seattle Center.  The four-day volunteer-driven clinic provides a full range of free dental, vision and medical care to underserved and vulnerable populations in the region. The next Clinic is scheduled for October 26 – 29, 2017.

If you or someone you know is in need of a routine checkup or has more serious concerns for their vision, dental or general medical health, now is your chance to receive excellent care from highly trained and generous professionals, for free.

This amazing event is brought to the community by the Seattle Center Foundation and supported by donations from community members like you.

To learn more about getting involved or donating to help to keep this event going, please visit their website or click here.

 

Keeping our community healthy is of the utmost importance and events like this make that possible. Thank you to all of the volunteers, professional and community donations that make this event possible, and our community a better place to live!

Uptown Residents Concerned Over Increased Zoning Heights

The City Council most recently hosted a public meeting to discuss the re-zoning of Uptown/Lower Queen Anne on September 11th, and now they are preparing to make zoning changes. Although preliminary approval has been granted, residents are concerned about a significant loss of natural light for homes and residential buildings in the rezone area.

In some parts of Uptown and Lower Queen Anne, the rezone allows for double the limit of current building heights. Currently, the limit on buildings around the Seattle Center is 40 feet, but that could more than double to 85 feet for new construction in some areas.

While some groups are strongly in favor of the plan, since it will create a greater opportunity for the additional low income housing that the city desperately needs, others are concerned about the negative effects.

CEO of the nearby Bayview Nursing Home, Mary Cordts, is worried about a loss of daylight for members of the retirement community. “The residents will not have sun in the winter. Please honor, not abandon, those nursing home residents and do not allow an 85 foot rezone,” she said in the review meeting. She followed up by mentioning that a 65 foot limit would be more acceptable.

The final vote on the rezoning will take place early this month, and Seattle City Councilmember Mike O’Brien said they would discuss the daylight issue prior to that vote.

Featured photo source: Seattle.gov

Community Funding, Public Bonds Discussed for KeyArena Renovation

By Chris Daniels

The City of Seattle may need to float a bond to pay for a KeyArena transportation fund to fulfill a $660 million proposal to renovate the site.

That was one of the key questions raised during a lengthy review of the tentative agreement, between the Oak View Group (OVG) and City of Seattle.

OVG agreed on the deal with Seattle’s Office of Economic Development to build a $600 million arena at the current KeyArena site last week. It still needs Seattle City Council approval to proceed.

The agreement, called a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), also lays out $20 million for a community fund and a $40 million transportation fund. OVG has agreed to pay for it all with private money.

But on Monday, upon questioning from Seattle City Councilmember Rob Johnson, the key negotiators mentioned a wrinkle: Seattle may have to bond against the fund.

City Budget Director Ben Noble acknowledged the MOU only calls for OVG to make payments of roughly $1 million a year over 39 years.

“We could, as a city, choose to bond against that,” Noble said. “So current present value basis, it’s 20 million dollars.”

Transportation questions ruled the long briefing. However, the council is expected to drill down on the financing as well.

OVG has offered to cover cost overruns and displacement bills for current tenants. It has also agreed to spend more than $168 million in capital improvement costs to vest two extensions at the site.

OVG believes it can open in the building in September of 2020.  That timeline works for a potential NHL franchise to call Seattle home.

Council chambers were packed with mostly supportive people, including groups who operate out of Seattle Center. Pottery Northwest, in particular, was initially worried about the development. However, their Executive Director James Lobb told the council he’d been encouraged by the discussions with OVG.  Pottery Northwest’s building was slated to be torn down in the arena development. However, OVG has agreed to temporarily relocate the business during construction and put it back in its historic building.

Only a pair of people testified in support of the SoDo Arena project, which, technically, has an agreement with the city that expires in December.

The council is slated to have at least three more meetings on the topic — October 10 and November 16.  The Council could vote on the MOU as early as December 4 or after the SoDo deal expires.

OVG’s Lance Lopes issued a statement after the meeting, expressing optimism.

“We applaud the City of Seattle for its open, collaborative and transparent approach to determining an exciting future for the New Arena at Seattle Center. Today’s meeting in City Council chambers reaffirmed our belief in the broad support for this project as evidenced by the strong turnout. Our team at OVG has been building arenas in communities around the world for nearly 40 years. We’ve seen a lot over four decades – and learned a lot too. We remain laser focused on our project and our partnership with the community, the Uptown, South Lake Union, Queen Anne and Belltown neighborhoods, and the City of Seattle. We will continue to aggressively pursue an NHL franchise, the return of the NBA, and through our close collaboration with Live Nation, make the New Arena at Seattle Center a globally-relevant live music destination.

“The path we’re on with the City, the community and each of our partners is the path we all want for Seattle: A future with a vibrant new arena that’s home to professional hockey, basketball and the biggest concerts and live events on earth. And today we’re one step closer to making that future a reality.”

Syndicated from King5.com